Photographic Thoughts—11/15/2020 to 11/21/2020

“There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes.” — Abraham Lincoln

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

I would like to get more people to view and like my Facebook page. Over the next two weeks, I will be asking people to criticize my photography, good and bad, and I would ask them to note the photo of mine they like the best. I will put the names together and one person will receive an 8 x 10 print of that photo mailed to them. Good luck!

Sunday 11/15/2020: Posted photo—Bryce Canyon.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 200, f/11, 1/200, 29 mm.

My family loves to travel. We like to get in the car and then drive to a National Park or two or more while visiting family and friends throughout the country. During one of the trips we stopped at, camped at, and hike in Bryce Canyon National Park. It was a rainy day and the dirt at Bryce is like clay. It took weeks, if not months, to get all the clay out of my hiking boots.

“Bryce Canyon National Park, a sprawling reserve in southern Utah, is known for crimson-colored hoodoos, which are spire-shaped rock formations. The park’s main road leads past the expansive Bryce Amphitheater, a hoodoo-filled depression lying below the Rim Trail hiking path. It has overlooks at Sunrise Point, Sunset Point, Inspiration Point and Bryce Point. Prime viewing times are around sunup and sundown.” ― Google

This photo is of a tree on the Rim Trail at the end of the Navajo Loop Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. The Navajo Loop Trail is a popular trail that makes a short 1- to 2-hour loop from the rim at Sunset Point down to the floor of Bryce Canyon. The trail visits favorite hoodoo formations such as Wall Street, Twin Bridges, and Thor’s Hammer.

Monday 11/16/2020: Posted photo—Cashews.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 3200, f/5.6, 1/13, 135 mm

Cashews are a kidney-shaped seed sourced from the cashew tree — a tropical tree native to Brazil but now cultivated in various warm climates across the world. Although commonly referred to as tree nuts, and nutritionally comparable to them, cashews are really seeds.

Today I needed a photo, so I saw our container of cashews and took this shot. Note: if your have been reading my blogs, you notice that the reason why I took this photo is common. I need a shot and took one of objects in, or around, my house. We have a container of cashews in our house since I put cashews in my trail mix.

Tuesday 11/17/2020: Posted photo—Strange things are a Foot.

Settings: FLIR i5, ISO N/A, f/N/A, 1/30, 7 mm.

What am I going to take a photo of today? I have not taken a photo in a while using my IR camera. Why do I have an IR camera you may be asking? I have an IR camera because I do inspections of power plants and heat surveys for friends and family for insulation in their homes. The camera is also a great stud finder if you are working in a house and need to find a stud.

I like taking photos with this camera. If I put my hand on a pile of paper, I can lift 5 or 6 sheets and still see the heat profile of my hand. I have walked on the floor and could look back to see my footprints. I also use it to look at our wood stove to see how far the heat is traveling up the stack. Just a note that the thermometers that attach to the stack of a wood stove are accurate. The temperature on the thermometer and the temperature on my IR camera were the same when I did this test. Today I just wanted to take a photo of my foot and then came up with the cleaver caption for this photo.

Wednesday 11/18/2020: Posted photo—Can you Hear Me Now.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/7.1, 1/800 s, 135 mm

Communication towers, or cell phone towers, are part of our landscape. When they first went up, they were noticed by many people. Now they are just part of the landscape and not too many people notice them. This tower is one that I see every day on my way to work.

In our area there are many hills, so these communication towers are multiplying. There are some cell phone companies that have better service than others. That must be true in most parts of the country and the world.

Thursday 11/19/2020: Posted photo—Academy Hill.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/400 s, 28 mm

Westminster Village–Academy Hill Historic District encompasses the historic first town center of Westminster, Massachusetts, as well as its later early-19th century commercial core. Centered at the junction Main and South Streets with Academy Hill Road, it contains fine examples of Colonial, Federal, and Greek Revival architecture, including the 1839 town hall. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

I take a photo at academy hill occasionally, since is shows the quaintness of a New England town. I love photographing the gazebo and the colonial house on the hill. I have taken photos of Wachusett Mountain on the hill from near the colonial house. This is the location that the town crest of Wachusett Mountain was taken.

Friday 11/20/2020: Post photo— Silhouette at Sunset.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/125 s, 47 mm

Every sunset is different. Today I was going to a location to take my photo of the day and saw the sunset through the trees. I just loved the silhouette of the tress, took some shots, and hoped that some of them were useable. I did like the way this one came out. Hope you do also.

I never did make it to my planed location.

Saturday 11/21/2020: Post photo—The Sun Going Down.

Settings: FinePix XP70, ISO 100, f/8, 1/750 s, 16 mm

From the summit of Wachusett Mountain. The sun was going in and out of clouds banks when I arrived at the summit. I took this photo and started to hike back down to my car. The auto road is not open, but the ski area just opened. Still too many people on the summit. Cannot wait until it gets colder. Fewer people will be on the summit.

There are a few bushwhacking trails on the mountain that I will try out soon. I will keep you posted.

Common statement at the end of my blog: That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts and constructive criticism is always wanted. I do not take criticism personally, just an opportunity to better my photography and writing skills.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

For those in the United States, have a safe and restful Thanksgiving Day.

Photographic Thoughts—11/08/2020 to 11/14/2020

“Climb up on some hill at sunrise. Everybody needs perspective once in a while, and you’ll find it there.” — Robb Sagendorph

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

The first parts of each of these days were written by someone else with my paraphrasing.

Sunday 11/01/2020: Posted photo—Stay on Marked Trails.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/958, 4 mm.

Hiking is Nature’s Therapy

In today’s world of chaos and constant stimulation, it is hard to quiet the mind and think. Getting into Nature offers a way to find some silence and clarity; and it is an important tool to counter our standards of survival in society. The more and more pressure we put on ourselves, the more our health degrades. Our minds and bodies need silence to regenerate.

  1. Hiking Soothes and Clears the Mind
  2. Hiking Makes us More Mindful
  3. Hiking Rejuvenates and Increases Happiness
  4. Nature offers us Advice

Today I found out that my Uncle and godfather passed at the age of 89. He was one of the younger ones still alive in my mother’s family. I prayed for him during Mass and found out that he passed about the same time I was praying for him. He now joins his twin brother and his youngest brother. When I got back home, I went on an eight-mile hike. Hiking is good for you.

This photo was taken at Crow Hills in Leominster State Forest as I was hiking that section of the Midstate Trail.

Monday 11/02/2020: Posted photo—Who is it.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/200, 135 mm

It has been a while since I posted a photo challenge. This one, I thought, was going to be an easy one to guess. Our son loved Blue’s Clues when he was young and our grand, or great, niece loves playing with the Blue’s Clues characters. I took out one of my macro filters to take this photo.

Slippery is a bar of soap who lives in the bathroom of the Blue’s Clues House. He slips and slides across surfaces to get around. Slippery’s catchphrase is “Whoa!” and he dreams of becoming the captain of a boat when he grows older. Slippery is often seen alongside his best friend Tickety.

Tuesday 11/03/2020: Posted photo—Todays Photo.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 200, f/1.7, 1/40, 4 mm.

Aloe is a cactus-like plant that grows in hot, dry climates. It is cultivated in subtropical regions around the world, including the southern border areas of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California.

Historically, aloe has been used for skin conditions and was thought to improve baldness and promote wound healing.

Aloe is used topically (applied to the skin) and orally. Topical use of aloe is promoted for acne, lichen planus (a very itchy rash on the skin or in the mouth), oral submucous fibrosis, burning mouth syndrome, burns, and radiation-induced skin toxicity. Oral use of aloe is promoted for weight loss, diabetes, hepatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease (a group of conditions caused by gut inflammation that includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis).

This aloe plant is in one of the offices at work. I have said this many times, this time of year is difficult for me to take photos since it is dark when I go into work and dark when I leave to go home from work. To keep up my streak of taking and posting a photo every day for almost 12 years, I took this photo in case I was not able to take another one during the day.

Wednesday 11/04/2020: Posted photo—Veterans Day.

Settings: N/A. This is a scanned photo.

World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

This is a photo of my father and a friend taken during World War II. My father was a veteran of the U.S. Navy.

Thursday 11/05/2020: Posted photo—Calculator.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 250, f/1.7, 1/17, 4 mm.

Reverse Polish notation (RPN) is a method for representing expressions in which the operator symbol is placed after the arguments being operated on. Polish notation, in which the operator comes before the operands, was invented in the 1920s by the Polish mathematician Jan Lucasiewicz. In the late 1950s, Australian philosopher and computer scientist Charles L. Hamblin suggested placing the operator after the operands and hence created reverse polish notation.

I have many calculators, the ones that I use the most are RPN calculators. The one in the photo is my primary calculator. I have two other backup RPN calculators that I use, and I have a RPN calculator app on my phone. As a mechanical engineer, I find it much easier to do calculations in RPN notation.

Friday 11/06/2020: Post photo—Nauset Light.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/11, 1/800 s, 18 mm

Nauset Light, officially Nauset Beach Light, is a restored lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore near Eastham, Massachusetts, erected in 1923 using the 1877 tower that was moved here from the Chatham Light. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

My wife and I normally go away a few weekends a year to go looking for lighthouses in New England. This year because of COVID-19 we were unable to travel. I took this photo during one of our Cape Cod lighthouse trips. We would visit up to 10 lighthouses in our travels over our weekend getaways.

Saturday 11/07/2020: Post photo—Camera.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/100 s, 72 mm

The Imperial Magimatic X50 126 Magicube camera was a simple viewfinder camera introduced in 1975 for Kodapak film cartridges. It was made by Imperial in the U.S.A. and used Magicubes for flash photography instead of flashcubes or bulbs like earlier Imperial 126 cameras such as the Imperial Instant Load 900, hence its name. The Magicube let cameras such as these have flash capability without needing batteries. The Magimatic X50 has a large thumb wheel film advance, automatic flash cube advance, frame view window on the back of the camera and a handy carry strap. The single shutter speed is approximately 1/100 of a second and the aperture is about f/5.6. The camera was introduced in 1975 and was somewhat of a copy of the Kodak line of instamatics. The X in the X50 was intended to remind the user that the camera took only the X-type Magicubes.

This camera belongs to my oldest brother. He took it to Morocco when he as in the Peace Corps. It had his address in Marrakech on it.

The Peace Corps is an independent agency and volunteer program run by the United States Government providing international social and economic development assistance. It was founded by President Kennedy in 1961. I can remember using special airmail stationary to send him letters. In those day there was no internet and you had to write letters to each other. It was always exciting to receive a letter back. He was in the Peace Corps in the mid 1970’s teaching English.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts and constructive criticism is always wanted. I do not take criticism personally, just an opportunity to better my photography and writing skills.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

All the photos on my website are for sale. Just message me for prices. I am not into photography to make money. I post my photos because it is something I love to do and to bring people to places that they may not go.

Photographic Thoughts—11/01/2020 to 11/07/2020

“When people ask me what equipment I use – I tell them my eyes.”— Anonymous

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Sunday 11/01/2020: Posted photo—Red Oak Leave.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/50, 100 mm

I was going to title this photo “the invasion of the red oak leaves”. The day after the snow this week, the yard was no longer white, it was brown, covered with red oak leaves. Not too much white showing. Looking up at the trees, there is still many leave to drop. Need to wait for the snow to melt to rake them up.

Red Oak trees are abundant on my property. Acorns from this tree are at the top of the food preference list for blue jays, wild turkeys, squirrels, small rodents, whitetail deer, raccoons and black bears. Deer also browse the buds and twigs in wintertime. I have seen all of these animal in our yard at one time or another. The oaks bristle-tipped leaves turn red in the fall. The leaves have 7 to 11 waxy lobes. The tree grows as much as two feet a year for 10 years. It grows to 60′ to 75′ with a 45′ spread.

I will be posting a photo of the acorns later in the week.

Monday 11/02/2020: Posted photo—Moon.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 125, f/8, 1/125, 300 mm

As many of you know, I have been attempting to photograph the moon for the last 11 years. I have taken many shots, using different setting, handheld and on a tripod. This photo was taken this morning as I was getting out of my car at work. It is handheld. I have been doing my breathing practice since I do not have image stabilization on my shorter, 300 mm, zoom lens.

Tuesday 11/03/2020: Posted photo—Hot Stuff.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/7.1, 1/60, 53 mm

Today in the US, there was an election for the president and other officed, both local and national. I voted by mail because of COVID-19. Some believe it does not exist. I am not one of those people because I know people affected by this virus.

When I arrived home after work, I restarted the fire in our wood stove. I just like the glowing coals, and since I did not take any other leisure photos today, I took this one.

It is a tough time of year for me to take photos since I go to work in the dark and leave work in the dark.

Wednesday 11/04/2020: Posted photo— Owachomo Bridge.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/125, 18 mm

I did not travel yesterday because of all the possible crazy people out there voting. So today we travel to Natural Bridges National Monument. Does this bridge look familiar? It is photographed mostly at night with the Milky Way behind it. We were traveling through the park on our way to spend a couple of nights in Arches National Park.

Owachomo is the smallest and thinnest of the three natural bridges in the park and is commonly thought to be the oldest. We may never know for certain, because each of the bridges is eroding at different rates. Regardless of its relative age, Owachomo Bridge is an awe-inspiring feat of erosion.

Height: 106 feet (32 meters)
Span: 180 feet (55 meters)
Width: 27 feet (8 meters)
Thickness: 9 feet (3 meters)

Thursday 11/05/2020: Posted photo—Sky at Dusk.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/3056, 4 mm.

Today was one of those days where I need to take a photo and I did not know what to take. As I was walking between buildings at work, I saw the sun setting, took out my phone, and took this photo. As stated earlier it is getting more difficult for me to take a photo during the day due to the hours of daylight.

Friday 11/06/2020: Post photo— Cassiopeia.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5, 15 s, 53 mm

I was challenged by a friend during a hike to take photos of constellations. Not easy to do. I needed to get my setting set so there were no movements in the stars. I also need to have enough light go into my camera so I could see the stars. This was my first conscience attempt of capturing a constellation. It will not me my last one. Thank you for the challenge.

Cassiopeia is a constellation in the northern sky, named after the vain queen Cassiopeia in Greek mythology, who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. Cassiopeia was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century Greek astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations today.

Saturday 11/07/2020: Post photo— Acorns.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 80, f/1.7, 1/120, 4 mm.

Stated earlier in the week, we have may red oak trees in our yard. These acorns came from those trees. They are very dangerous to walk on since it is almost like walking on little balls. These were under the leaves that I have shown you on Sunday. It was a very warm day today, so I spent the morning raking up the leaves and removing the acorns.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts and constructive criticism is always wanted. I do not take criticism personally, just an opportunity to better my photography and writing skills.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

All the photos on my website are for sale. Just message me for prices. I am not into photography to make money. I post my photos because it is something I love to do and to bring people to places that they may not go.

Photographic Thoughts—10/25/2020 to 10/31/2020

“Photography is an itch that won’t go away. No matter how much you scratch it.” — Dara McGrath

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some very short thoughts about my photos. Please comment and give me suggestions for future photos.

This week has been a crazy week with all the rain, the explosion in the COVID-19, and all the excitement and worry about next week’s election. Hoping that this blog gives you hope and makes you enjoy life a little better.

Sunday 10/25/2020: Posted photo—Mums.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/5, 1/1000, 41 mm

Chrysanthemums (mums) are one of the most popular fall garden flowers. Most varieties are easy to grow with their basic needs being full sun, rich soil, good drainage, and good air circulation. There are hundreds of varieties available in a range of shapes and sizes that can provide blooms from late summer through fall. Chrysanthemums symbolize different things in different countries: life and rebirth in Asia, sympathy in Europe, and respect and honor in America.

These mums are at my in-law’s house. We stopped in after church today to pick something up from them before we went back home. The masses were held outdoors this weekend. We keep our social distance and wore our masks while were there. We stayed in the car while we waited for the items to be gathered and handed off. I was looking for something interesting to photograph, but the weather did not cooperate. I take many photos throughout the day and then choose one at the end of the day to post. This was the only photo that I took today. If I did not take it, I would have to post a photo from the past. I may be doing that many times this week because of the weather.

Monday 10/26/2020: Posted photo—Headstones.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5, 1/50, 45 mm

Gravestones remember the dead by honoring life. That is why tombstones typically feature names, family relationships, dates of birth and death — to make it clear to all who come after that here lies a person who lived, who loved, and who matters to those left behind. The most personal gravestone memorials also include a little something more, a favorite quote perhaps, or a symbol reflecting an affinity the deceased had. Often this extra something on a headstone is an epitaph, a phrase written in memory of a person who has died.

The plan for my photos this week is to take spooky photo leading up to Halloween. This may not happen since the weather is predicted to be rainy for most of the week. This does not leave me much time to get out and take photos since the daylight is getting shorter.

The effect in this photo is one of cross processing. Cross Processing is intentionally processing film in the wrong chemicals, creating interesting and unpredictable color shifts and increased contrast. Since I do not process film much these days, this cross process is done in my digital dark room. I shoot RAW so I need to process all my photos.

Tuesday 10/27/2020: Posted photo—Travel Tuesday.

Settings: KODAK DC3200 DIGITAL CAMERA, f/3.6, 1/360

Nyhavn is a 17th-century waterfront, canal and entertainment district in Copenhagen, Denmark. Stretching from Kongens Nytorv to the harbor front just south of the Royal Playhouse, it is lined by brightly colored 17th and early 18th century townhouses and bars, cafes, and restaurants.

Nyhavn 17 is a restaurant/bar and has been owned by the From Family for many generations. Today by father and son going strong on 3rd and 4th generation. It is a French and danish brasserie serving Danish Classics such as smørrebrød and snaps. Live music in the weekends and seafoods platters in the summer. A little bit of everything in heart of Copenhagen.

This photo was taken many years ago with my 1 megapixel camera during one of my trips to Denmark. I knew the city of Copenhagen well during my travels. I had some time off from work where I was able to explore the city during my first visits. Using my Latin and French language backgrounds, I was able to read the language well. I can read and understand Danish much better than I and speak the language or understand it when someone is talking to me in Danish.

Wednesday 10/28/2020: Posted photo—Go with the Flow.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/25, 1/5, 45 mm

I like to hike, and you know. I like to hike in near rivers, streams, and lakes because the water relaxes me. I like to hike in the woods and other places because the isolation clears my mind and gives me a great new start to my week.

This photo was taken along the Mid State Trail. It was a handheld photo. I was practicing my breathing techniques when taken long exposure photos. There are two schools of thought on how to breath while taking a long exposure photo. Marksmanship experts say to either inhale and exhale half a breath and pause or exhale a full breath and pause. Gently press the shutter release during the pause before you complete your exhalation or inhale again.

Thursday 10/29/2020: Posted photo—The Eternal Flame.

Settings: None available since this photo was processed as a .png file.

John F. Kennedy made his first formal visit to Arlington National Cemetery on Veterans Day, November 11, 1961, to place a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. At the conclusion of the ceremony, President Kennedy spoke to more than 5,000 people gathered in the Memorial Amphitheater.

Eleven days prior to Kennedy’s assassination, he returned to Arlington for the 1963 Veterans Day services. This time, he did not address the crowd in the amphitheater. On November 22, 1963, while on a campaign trip to Dallas, President Kennedy was shot and killed.

Kennedy is one of only two presidents buried at Arlington. The other is William Howard Taft, who died in 1930.

The initial plot was 20 feet by 30 feet and was surrounded by a white picket fence. During the first year after Kennedy’s death, up to 3,000 people per hour visited his gravesite, and on weekends an estimated 50,000 people visited. Three years after Kennedy’s death, more than 16 million people had visited the gravesite.

Because of the large crowds, cemetery officials and members of the Kennedy family decided that a more suitable site should be constructed. Construction began in 1965 and was completed on July 20, 1967. Lit by Mrs. Kennedy during the funeral, an eternal flame burns from the center of a five-foot circular granite stone at the head of the grave.

During my visit to Arlington National Cemetery, I could feel the pride and honor of the people entombed here. At the Eternal Flame, there are many signs to be quiet and respectful. Most people complied, but many people just did not care and had to be told many times by the sentry to be quiet and respectful.

Arlington National Cemetery is a place that every American should visit at least once in their life. Such history, sacrifice, and honor is felt as you explore the graves.

Friday 10/30/2020: Post photo—Staghorn Sumac.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/50, 75 mm

We are having the first measurable snow of the season. Not much snow, just enough to cover the grass and the trees and to make driving difficult for the New Englanders that forgot how to drive in this weather. While out walking today, I saw this staghorn sumac shrub. I have photographed it a few times with snow on the sumac because I like the contract between the red and the white.

Here is a little information about the shrub: The staghorn Sumac is a 15-30 ft., colony-forming, deciduous shrub with crooked, leaning trunks, picturesque branches and velvety twigs. Large, bright-green, pinnately-compound leaves become extremely colorful in early fall.

Saturday 10/31/2020: Post photo—Leominster State Forest.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/320, 21 mm

“Thus in the winter stands the lonely tree, Nor knows what birds have vanished one by one, Yet knows its boughs more silent than before” —Edna St. Vincent Millay

This is one of my favorite trees to photograph. It is in Crow Hills Pond in Leominster State Forest. I like the simplicity of the tree and the solitude of the tree. Since we had the first measurable snow fall of the season yesterday, I was looking for a location to take a photo of water, trees, and snow and thought of this location.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts, difunctional as they are.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.

All the photos on my website are for sale. Just message me for prices. I am not into photography to make money. I post my photos because it is something I love to do and to bring people to places that they may not go.

Photographic Thoughts—10/18/2020 to 10/24/2020

“The eye should learn to listen before it looks.” — Robert Frank

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some very short thoughts about my photos. Please comment and give me suggestions for future photos.

Sunday 10/11/2020: Posted photo—Mount Monadnock.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/160, 255 mm

Mount Monadnock, or Grand Monadnock, is a 3,165 ft mountain in the towns of Jaffrey and Dublin, New Hampshire. This is the mountain as seen from the summit of Wachusett Mountain tonight. I was doing a sunset hike but the clouds came in, so the sunset was not photo posting quality.

In 1987, Mount Monadnock was designated a National Natural Landmark. The National Natural Landmarks Program recognizes and encourages the conservation of sites that contain outstanding biological and geological resources. Sites are designated by the Secretary of the Interior for their condition, illustrative character, rarity, diversity, and value to science and education. The National Park Service administers the program and works cooperatively with landowners, managers, and partners to promote conservation and appreciation of our nation’s natural heritage.

Mount Monadnock is said to be the second most climbed mountain in the world. Falling second only to Mount Fuji in Japan.

Monday 10/12/2020: Posted photo—Do You Like My Hat.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/50, 120 mm

A Muscovy duck at The 1761 Old Mill Restaurant. Muscovy duck are not native to this area. There is a pair of the duck that hang out at the duck pond at the Old Mill. They are there year-round. Who would blame them since they are getting feed by the patrons.

The top of this duck looks like a hat, thus the title of this photo. This duck was just sitting around with the other ducks. Its mate was hanging around with the geese.

I am lucky to have such a great spot to take photos when I need a quick one and when there is light. I only take photos at the Old Mill on Monday’s since it is closed on Monday.

Tuesday 10/13/2020: Posted photo—Browns.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/100, 25 mm

This time of year, all the bright foliage has gone past and the brown colors are starting to peak. The leaves change colors at different times during the fall. It starts out with the bright reds and yellow and then it turns to shades of brown before I must clean up the leaves from our yard.

Wednesday 10/14/2020: Posted photo—Spider.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 3200, f/7.1, 1/100, 135 mm

I take product photos at work every day as part of my job. While I was taking photos this morning, I saw this spider on a box. This small spider looked interesting to me. I liked the colors on this spider, so I took a photo if it.

I am not happy with the way this photo came out. Because of the bad light in the shop and because I had to crop this photo to see the spider better, there is much noise in this photo.

binary comment

Thursday 10/08/2020: Posted photo— More Browns in HDR.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/100, 36 mm

A couple of days ago, I took a photo of browns. Today I took another photo of browns. This time I used the High Dynamic Range (HDR) technique because I wanted to capture the blue sky. If I metered to the sky, the trees were too dark. If I metered to the trees, the sky was washed out.

HDR stands for “high dynamic range.” For those who are not so acquainted with this high-tech shutterbug lingo, dynamic range is basically just the difference between the lightest light and darkest dark you can capture in a photo. Once your subject exceeds the camera’s dynamic range, the highlights tend to wash out to white, or the darks simply become big black blobs. It is notoriously difficult to snap a photo that captures both ends of this spectrum, but with modern shooting techniques and advanced post-processing software, photographers have devised ways to make it happen. This is basically what HDR is: a specific style of photo with an unusually high dynamic range that could not otherwise be achieved in a single photograph. At the most basic level, an HDR photo is just two (or three, or nine) photos taken at different exposure levels and then mashed together with software to create a better picture. This photo is the combination of three photos. The exposures are -2, 0, and +2.

Friday 10/09/2020: Post photo— Wachusett Mountain View.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/100, 100 mm

Wachusett Mountain from Academy Hill. This view is found on the Westminster town crest. This is a wonderful view of the mountain. The farmer’s market was being setup on Academy Hill tonight when I was taking this photo. I take a photo at this location three to four times a year since the view of the mountain is one of the best views. I like this view because of the framing of the trees.

Saturday 10/10/2020: Post photo—Did You Lose a Shoe.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/200, 64 mm

You find many things hanging off trees on a hiking trail—Gloves, hats, socks, and other pieces of clothing. Today I found a horseshoe. I wonder if the horse will be looking for it. The shoe looks like it was hanging on the tree for a while. Today was more of a walk than a hike. I walked 3.5 miles in an hour, while sometimes it takes an hour to hike less than a mile depending on the terrain.

Walking is done on flat, hard, and level surfaces without any obstruction while hiking is done on rocky mountains, hills, and terrains with rough surfaces. Hiking requires more effort more than walking because the trail is more complicated. Hiking means you are moving from a lower to a higher place or in elevation.

Here are a few more photos from today.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts, difunctional as they are.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.

All the photos on my website are for sale. Just message me for prices. I am not into photography to make money. I post my photos because it is something I love to do and to bring people to places that they may not go.

Photographic Thoughts—10/11/2020 to 10/17/2020

“There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.” — Ansel Adams

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some very short thoughts about my photos. Please comment and give me suggestions for future photos.

Sunday 10/11/2020: Posted photo—Wachusett Mountain.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/500, 37 mm

Looking at Wachusett Mountain from Wachusett Lake. This 250 million year old mountain is a metamorphic rock monadnock. The name of the mountain means “Near the mountain” given by the Natick Indians. 250 million years ago, it was 20,000 feet tall. It is now 2,006 feet tall. The height will be officially changed to 2,009 feet very soon. The mountain has a 922 foot prominence.

Most of you know that this is the mountain that I climb often since it is just 5 to 10 minutes from my house, depending on the trail that I take. Many people in the area do not believe that hiking Wachusett is difficult. Some trails are not. I can take them on a route that would make the hike very difficult for them.

Monday 10/12/2020: Posted photo—Covered Walkway.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/4.5, 1/30, 33 mm

The 1761 Old Mill Restaurant, or just the Old Mill, is a family-run place serving American fare in a rustic mill dating from 1761. The Old Mill is not far from my house or work, so I go there often to take photos. The Old Mill has a duck pond, a waterfall, and two covered walkways. Originally a saw mill where logs were processed for the new homes of the neighborhood, the Old Mill and its whirling saw sang a song of progress and industry through five generations of ownership in the same family, before its wheels were stilled and it fell into disrepair. If you ever dine at the Old Mill, try out their corn fritters.

I took this photo because I like the way the covered bridge was eliminated. They are normally closed for business on Mondays, so I was a little surprised when there were many cars in the parking lot. It did look like they were setup for a wedding.

Tuesday 10/13/2020: Posted photo—North Cascades National Park.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 100, f/10, 1/160, 47 mm

Fewer than three hours by car from Seattle or Vancouver, North Cascades National Park in Washington is home to more than 300 glaciers and over 500 lakes and ponds—attracting 30,085 visitors in 2018. Even in a regular year some of the park’s sites close for winter weather starting in late September. Scenic Cascade River Road has recently reopened, providing access to some of the park’s most scenic hiking and climbing trails. This park is number 6 in the least visited US National Parks.

The mountain is this photo can be seen from the Thunder Knob Trail. The trail leads to a great overlook of the Thunder Arm area of Diablo Lake in North Cascades National Park.

Wednesday 10/14/2020: Posted photo—Moon and Venus.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/250, 135 mm

The moon was amazing this morning. I attempted to capture the Earthshine off the moon but did not capture it. Venus was just above the moon, almost like they were dancing.

This is a handheld photo. I took out my 300 mm zoom lens and took a photo of just the moon. I experimented with setting on my camera and did not do so well capturing the Earthshine since it would have been a long exposure photo. I then focused in on taking a photo of the moon and Venus together. I am happy with the outcome. If the weather is clear tomorrow morning, I will put my camera on a tripod an attempt to get the Earthshine again. After taken over a thousand photos of the moon, I have never captured the Earthshine correctly.

How many times did I say Earthshine today? Much too many.

Thursday 10/08/2020: Posted photo—Pants.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 250, f/1.7, 1/24, 4 mm

Last week I posted a picture of a pile of wood. This photo is from the same pile of wood and I took this today. Looking at this photo I see a pair of pants with a face peaking over the waistline.

What do you see?

Friday 10/09/2020: Post photo—Fall Colors.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/5.6, 1/100, 37 mm

Today it rained. I rained off and on, but it mostly rained. These trees look great on a sunny day with the sunlight drawing out their colors. Today the gray sky and the rain gave these trees a different look. I liked the way they looked in contrast with the gray sky.

When the weather is not that great, I take photos throughout the day and pick on the best one I took. Today this one won out over all the photos that I had taken today. Hope you liked it.

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Saturday 10/10/2020: Post photo—Sun through the Trees.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/160, 67 mm

Today the forecast was for rain most of the day. Because of this, I did some cleaning around the house. The rain was over much earlier than predicted. It was forecast to run until about 3 p.m. but it was over by 8 a.m. I was looking at the sun shining through the trees as I was cleaning.

When I was done with the housework, I took this photo.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts, difunctional as they are.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.

Photographic Thoughts—10/04/2020 to 10/11/2020

“A photograph is usually looked at—seldom looked into.” — Ansel Adams

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some very short thoughts about my photos. I wanted to spend less time writing this week and to spend more time outside. Please comment and give me suggestions for future photos.

Sunday 10/04/2020: Posted photo—New Trail Marker.

Settings: FinePix XP70, ISO 100, f/4.6, 1/30, 10 mm

Today I took a hike after church since I was mentally preparing for the procedure I was going to have on Monday. I hiked on Wachusett Mountain once again on one of my typical loops. I did not summit the mountain since there was a steady stream of people hiking when I was close to the summit. The auto road is still open, so the summit was very crowded.

When I hiked on one of the trails, I noticed new blazes on the trees. The blaze as always blue, it just did not have the tree on it. The nail you see above the blaze has a reflective coating on it. This is very helpful at night when you are looking to stay on the trail.

Monday 10/05/2020: Posted photo—Shoe.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 2000, f/5, 1/80, 50 mm

My wife takes care of our grandniece twice a week. Since I had my procedure today, my wife and grandniece picked me up at the hospital. She had these very cute shoes on with her favorite Sesame Street characters on them. Since I knew that I would not go out to take a photo, I took a photo of her cute shoe.

Tuesday 10/06/2020: Posted photo—Travel Tuesday.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/9, 1/800, 18 mm

Today we travel back in time to Kawaiahaʻo Church–the national house of prayer located in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. Kawaiahaʻo Church was established under Kuhina Nui (Queen-Regent) Kaʻahumanu I in the year 1820. The church supports the love of God and Hawaiian traditions throughout Hawaiʻi and beyond. Mahalo ke Akua!

We were in Hawaii the same time Hurricane Lane hit the island. We were able to get out of our rental condo before heading to our cruise ship after the storm passed and the shelter-in-place order was lifted. Not may places were open, so we explored the island from outside the buildings. We spent this day exploring the city of Honolulu.

Wednesday 10/07/2020: Posted photo—Fall.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/361, 4 mm

I stopped into the office for a little while to get my flu shot today. I was not ready to go back into the office full time today since I was still recovering. I needed a photo, so I stopped by one of my favorite and most photographed location and took this photo. I used the Orton technique on this photo. This is the same technique I used on a photo in the past.

Thursday 10/08/2020: Posted photo—I See the Moon.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 3200, f/16, 1/500, 300 mm

It has been a while since I took a photo of the moon. It may not seem like a while to some people but is has been a while for me. I was going to take a photo of the full moon a few days ago, but the moon was too low in the sky at the location I was going to take the photo. Looking at the ISO value, it looks like I forgot to change the ISO setting on my camera, so it is much too high for my liking. I would like the ISO for this phase of the moon to be about 400 not 3200.

Every moon photo is an adventure.

Friday 10/09/2020: Post photo—Quick Photo Day.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/125, 47 mm

Today I needed a photo. I when to this tree and was hoping that the leaves were changing color on it. They were not. I took the photo anyway since I needed a photo for today.

Some days, time just slips away, and I do not take planned photos.

Saturday 10/10/2020: Post photo—Wood.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/10, 1/250, 30 mm

We had a big burst of wind in the are on Wednesday evening. Many people lost power and lost trees. Some of the people are still out of power.

This photo is a pile of wood from a tree that came down in the area during that storm. The owner of the house was startled when the tree came down. Everyone is ok and the tree debris is being cleaned up.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts, difunctional as they are.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.

Photographic Thoughts — 9/27/2020 to 10/03/2020

“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”—Henri Cartier-Bresson

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some very short thoughts about my photos. I wanted to spend less time writing this week and to spend more time outside. Please comment and give me suggestions for future photos.

Sunday 09/27/2020: Posted photo — Saint Anne.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/900, 4 mm

Saint Anne is the mother of Mary. She is the grandmother of Jesus. In Ashburnham, there were two Catholic churches, Saint Anne’s Church in South Ashburnham, and Saint Denis Church in downtown Ashburnham. Saint Anne’s Church was condemned due to structural issues so icon and statues in the church were either moved to Saint Denis or donated to other churches in the diocese.

This statue of Saint Anne and Mary was moved to Saint Denis church where it is displayed in front of the church. The harsh New England weather is causing the paint to come off the wooden statue. Looks like a job for someone to tackle once this pandemic is over.

Monday 09/28/2020: Posted photo — A Touch of Red.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/250, 50 mm

I did not go to the Old Mill today because of timing. I took this photo on my way to work since I liked the touch of red in the foliage. This time of year is wonderful with the leaves changing and the weather fluctuating. You must keep an eye out for the color changes since it happens so quickly, and the colors pass so quickly. I have noticed the reds come first, then the yellows, then other colors. The colors look great, then you have to rack them up!

Tuesday 09/29/2020: Posted photo — Travel Tuesday.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 400, f/10, 1/640, 180 mm

Calving glaciers in Alaska. This one was taken on our first cruise, a cruise up the Northwest Passage up to Alaska. The cruise departed from Vancouver, just after my Bruins beat the Canucks for the Stanley Cup, to Juno, Alaska. This photo was taken in Glacier Bay National Park in Alaska. We were about one-half mile away from the glacier. The glacier looks blue because the ice is so dense, and blue is the only color that can escape. If you are up close to the glacier, the ice is clear.

If you ever get an opportunity to go to Alaska, take it. We woke up every day thinking that the scenery could not be better than the day before, but it was.

Wednesday 09/30/2020: Posted photo — Wildflower.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/8, 1/400, 113 mm

I walk by this wildflower often during my daily walk. I decided to take a photo of it and to find out its name. My plant identification all tells me is possibly the Hairy Michaelmas-daisy. I see it as one of nature’s wonderful works. Could you help me identify this flower.

Thursday 10/01/2020: Posted photo — Acorns.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/500, 18 mm

We have plenty of acorns in our yard. We also have many dents on our vehicles because of the acorns. The hurt if you get hit by one on your body.

The technique use in this photo is called triptych. Triptych is a picture or relief carving on three panels, typically hinged together side by side and used as an altarpiece. This is an offset triptych. I created a scrip in my photo editing software to do this. I wanted to use it on a photo today and this was the only photo that I took.

Friday 10/02/2020: Post photo — Gray Sky.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/250, 50 mm

Gray sky, nothing by gray sky. That is not right! The words are blue sky, nothing by blue sky.

I took this photo today since I like the way the clouds were layered. We have rain off an on today and the temperature started to drop. The layers in the clouds are caused by wind currents that are associated with a front. Natures sculpturing of the clouds.

Saturday 10/03/2020: Post photo — Grand Tetons.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 200, f/9, 1/640, 200 mm

Grand Teton mountains in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. We camped out in the park on our way to Yellowstone National Park.

Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands as a monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River, and enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.

When we arrived in the park, we were informed that there was a mother bear and her cubs that were seen around our campsite and to watch out for them. We had to do our laundry one night and walked on the main road to try to avoid surprising the bears. We were also told that the Teton bears are not like the Yosemite bears that can open car doors. We did experience bears going by our campsite when we camped out in Yosemite National Park, so we understood what she meant.

That is all for this week. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts, difunctional as they are.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.

Photographic Thoughts — 9/20/2020 to 9/26/2020

“Which of my photographs is my favorite? The one I’m going to take tomorrow.”—Imogen Cunningham

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some very short thoughts about my photos. I wanted to spend less time writing this week and to spend more time outside. Please comment and give me suggestions for future photos.

Sunday 09/20/2020: Posted photo — A Mothers Love.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/1324, 4 mm

Legend has it that when there was a great famine, the mother pecked a wound on herself so that she could feed her babies. Thus, she risked her own life for that of her children. It is an image of a mother’s love, but a mother’s love comes from the God, who made all mothers. Jesus came and risked His life to save us. This risk is not in word only. Jesus joyfully was willing to do what He could to save us from peril, even if that meant He would die.

Just like last week’s stained-glass window, this is on one of the stained-glass windows at St. Denis Church in Ashburnham MA. I really like the look of stained-glass windows in churches. I like the way the light beams threw them casting a prism of colors into the building.

Monday 09/21/2020: Posted photo — Motion.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/5.6, 1/30, 135 mm

The duck pond at the Old Mill is a location that I often visit to take photos. Today there was a family with young children feeding the ducks and geese. This duck saw the food an took off to get some.

Since motions photos are not one of my strong points, I wan to get some practice.

Tuesday 09/22/2020: Posted photo — Respect.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/1250, 41 mm

The flags are flow at half mask at the request of the president.

For an associate justice of the Supreme Court, a member of the Cabinet, a former vice president, the president pro tempore of the Senate, the majority leader of the Senate, the minority leader of the Senate, the majority leader of the House of Representatives, or the minority leader of the House of representatives the flag is to be displayed at half-staff from the day of death until interment.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg or RBG is the first women to lay in state at the US Capital.

Wednesday 09/23/2020: Posted photo — Reflection.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/125, 31 mm

I had to go to the doctor’s today for a follow-up appointment. On my way home from his office, I stopped in at Dunn State Park and took a photo of the trees changing color. The water was not as smooth as I would like but the photo came out to my liking.

Thursday 09/24/2020: Posted photo — Wind Power.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/500, 18 mm

Second follow-up from the doctor’s office. Today I had to have some test done. MWCC is very close to his office so I stopped in to take this photo.

Friday 09/26/2020: Post photo — Hike Destination.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/4000, 135 mm

I found out today that I needed to have a procedure done, so I needed to clear my head. Nothing serious, but an operation in these times is serious. I took my son on a hike today for the sunset. There were many people on the summit, so I took this photo and left.

Hiking is a great way to think about items and it was great to get back hiking with my son. We talked baseball most of the hike.

Saturday 09/26/2020: Post photo — Birch Leaves.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/60, 4 mm

Birch is one of the trees in our yard. I like the yellow color the leave change to in fall. Nature is wonderful this time of year with great colors.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.

Photographic Thoughts — 9/13/2020 to 9/19/2020

“Great photography is about depth of feeling, not depth of field.”— Peter Adams

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week. It helps keep me going. Enjoy my blog post!

Here are some short thoughts about my photos, and maybe some input on why it took or posting the photo.

Sunday 09/13/2020: Posted photo — Sacred Heart.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/405, 4 mm

The Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus recalls Christ’s love for us. In the Gospels, Jesus’ heart is moved with pity for the crowds (see Mt 9:36) and He tells us that He is gentle and humble of heart (Mt 11:29). The Sacred Heart of Jesus that began beating in the womb of the Blessed Virgin more than 2,000 years ago still beats today in the glorified humanity of the Risen Christ. And it will pulsate forever, pumping out the grace, mercy and life of God to all of humanity. In the Heart of the Lord, we experience the overwhelming mercy of God and His infinite desire to be in relationship with us.

The Sacred Heart in this photo is on one of the stained-glass windows at St. Denis Church in Ashburnham MA. I really like the look of stained-glass windows in churches. I like the way the light beams threw them casting a prism of colors into the building.

Monday 09/14/2020: Posted photo — Old Stone Church.

Settings: SM-G930V (Samsung Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/622, 4 mm

St. Anthony’s Roman Catholic Church was taken when the Wachusett Reservoir in West Boylston was created between 1896 and 1905, but the Baptist church a few yards away survived. Known now as the Old Stone Church, it’s one of the most photographed landmarks in Central Mass. and included on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Old Stone Church was built in the early 1890s to replace the Baptist church which had been lost in a fire. Hardly 10 years later, it had to be abandoned for the creation of the Wachusett reservoir. Because it was built of stone and was clearly going to be a scenic attraction, the commonwealth was persuaded by townsfolk to let it remain. It stands alone on a point of land by the side of the water as a reminder of what was lost to the reservoir.

The church collapsed in 1974 and was rebuilt starting in 1977. The roof was not rebuilt until 1980. The reconstruction of the Old Stone Church was completed in 1981. I have photographed this church many times.

Tuesday 09/15/2020: Posted photo — People.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/320, 21 mm

I normally do not photograph people. I say that I do not do people well. This photo is from the Flags on the 48 memorial hike that I did last Saturday. This is some of our group descending Mount Monroe, the fourth highest peak in the White Mountains. As you can tell by the photo, the weather was just perfect for hiking. This area of the Whites is in the clouds most of the year because of the influence of the nearby Mount Washington.

I like the contrasting colors in the photo. The dark rocks on the summit versus the blue sky versus the clothing of the hikers.

Wednesday 09/16/2020: Posted photo — Mountain Wood Aster.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/100, 126 mm

This wildflower is growing all around our property and in many locations in are area. A low maintenance perennial native to eastern and central North America the blue wood aster is commonly found naturalized in woodlands, meadows, or stream banks.  It can be weedy as it self-seeds very easily.

I took this photo after returning home from work today for two reasons: I needed a photo and I have been looking for a good time to photograph this flower.

I used the Orton technique. The Orton Effect is a technique that was developed by Michael Orton in the 1980s and remains one of the most popular post-processing techniques for landscape photographers today. While the technique has evolved since its first appearance, the core concept remains the same: create a dreamlike glow to an image.

Thursday 09/17/2020: Posted photo — Sun.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/100, 135 mm

The sun today has strange coloration. The sun yesterday did also. This is due to the wildfires in the western parts of the United States. I was hoping for no cloud cover, but the eerie coloration was also happening today.

Friday 09/18/2020: Post photo — Where is the Water.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/80, 22 mm

The dam at Round Meadow Pond is usually overflowing with water. I have photographed this location many times. A few years ago, I took a photo of this location on the first of the month for the full year to see how much the flow of the water changed during the year. This is not the lowest I have seen the water. It is close, but there is a time of year when there is low water flow due to lack of rains or other sources of water runoff.

This photo uses the HDR technique. It is a combination of an over-exposed, under-exposed and properly exposed photo.

Saturday 09/19/2020: Post photo — Pokeweed.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/5, 1/80, 55 mm

Pokeweed or pokeberry (Phytolacca americana) is a native plant that grows in disturbed soils, such as fields and pastures. The plant is hazardous to livestock and all parts of the plant are considered toxic. It is a perennial with a red, woody stem boasting long, oval leaves that may get up to ten inches long.

This plant is growing, and has been growing, in my mother’s yard. It has been growing there for as long as I can remember. I like how the plant looks like grapes. I took this photo today after delivering my mother’s groceries to her.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

I welcome any comments you may have on my photography and the thoughts on my photography. I would like input to better both.