Photographic Thoughts — 10/10/2021 to 10/16/2021

“Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” — Susan Sontag

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 10/10/2021: Posted photo — Lakeside.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/125 s, 32 mm.

Today we took the dock out of the water at the cottage. The water was cold when first going into it, and then it did not feel so bad. We need to go into the water to lift part of the dock off its foundation to bring it in. Many years ago, the tires on the bottle of the support legs on the dock fell off so we manually need to lift the dock out of the water.

Before the dock was removed, I went out on it to enjoy the foliage from out in the water. I took this photo shortly before the dock was removed from the water.

The day is always a fun filled day with family and friends.

Monday, 10/11/2021: Posted photo — Trees in the Sun.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/125 s, 50 mm.

This is the backside, or inlet side, of the falls at Round Meadow Pond. You have seen a few photos of the water flowing over the dam since that is one of my favorite spots to photograph. I took this photo because of the bright colors of the foliage, and I liked the way the light was reflecting off the trees.

Tuesday, 10/12/2021: Posted photo — More Foliage.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/160 s, 50 mm.

Not much to say about this photo. The foliage is starting to get to peak in this area, so I am taking as many foliage photos as I can.

One thing I can say about this photo, and my other foliage photos, is that they look very bright. The histogram looks good for these photos, but the photos look bright when viewing on some screens. It might be because I use calibrate monitors to edit my photos and the other monitors are not calibrated.

Time to do some research into this issue. Maybe I should get one or two of them printed to see how the colors come out.

Wednesday, 10/13/2021: Posted photo — Morning Dew.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/250 s, 72 mm.

I was going to post another foliage photos today but decided to post a photo of the morning dew. This photo was meant to show the dew and to break up my trend of foliage photos. Too much of a good thing is not always good.

I attempted to capture the light off the dew on the grass. Please leave a comment to let me know how well I captured the light and to give me some tips to improve.

Thursday, 10/14/2021: Posted photo — Lightning at Sea.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/5.6, 15 s, 48 mm.

15 second exposure looking out to see in Jacksonville Beach, FL a few years ago.

During a past vacation, my family rented a condominium on Jacksonville Beach. My wife has relatives that live in both Jacksonville Beach and Neptune Beach, so we travel to the area relatively often. Most of the time we rent a house or condo not on the beach.

A common occurrence in Florida is a storm out to sea at night. It is such a great sight to see the lightning in the distance. On this night, I decided to put my camera on my tripod, set the exposure time to 15 seconds, to capture the storm. After looking at the photos, my only regret was that I did not leave my shutter open for 30 seconds.

There will always be another trip back to the beach.

Here are a few camera settings for photographing daytime and nighttime lightning that I have picked up over the years:

Camera settings tips for photographing daytime lightning photos:

  • Set up camera on a sturdy tripod.
  • Turn off any image stabilization you might have. If image stabilization is on, the camera will think it is moving when the shutter engages, even though there is not camera movement.
  • Focus camera lens on infinity or on an object in the distance.
  • Set the aperture of the lens to f/16 or smaller. This will close the iris inside the lens, allowing a longer shutter speed to be used.
  • Set ISO to lowest it will go, for example use ISO 100.
  • Take a test exposure using the slowest shutter speed allowed to see if the image is exposed correctly and your focus is correct.
  • Set your camera on manual or bulb.
  • Use a remote timer/intervalometer to fire the shutter continuously.

Here is an example of a daytime lightning photo. This photo was handheld since the storm arrived quickly. For your information, we did not hike down into the Grand Canyon that day.

Camera settings for photographing night-time lightning

  • Set up camera on a sturdy tripod.
  • Turn off any image stabilization you might have. If image stabilization is on, the camera will think it is moving when the shutter engages, even though there is not camera movement.
  • Focus camera lens on infinity or on an object in the distance.
  • Set the aperture of the lens to a medium value, such as f/5.6 or f/8. This will allow a longer shutter speed by bringing in more light and improve image quality at the same time by allowing the use of a lower ISO value.
  • Set ISO to lowest it will go, for example set your is to ISO 100. You may have to increase your ISO to ISO 200–ISO 400 depending on the lighting in the area. I prefer my ISO set at ISO 100 for all my lightning shots.
  • Set your camera on manual or bulb.
  • Set the shutter speed to between 5 and 20 seconds. You can set it up to 30 seconds if you are in a dark area.
  • Take a test shot to see if the scene is exposed correctly, remembering that if a strike does happen in the field of view it could light up the scene considerably, depending on how big the strike looks in the photo.
  • Use a remote timer/intervalometer to fire the shutter continuously.

Friday, 10/15/2021: Post photo — Clouds.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/1250 s, 37 mm.

Today I am posting a photo of a cloud. I took many photos today, but this one was the only one that I liked.

Saturday, 10/16/2021: Post photo — Aster.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/5.6, 1/320 s, 106 mm.

I went to my mother’s house today to make sure everything was fine at the house. I also collected some of the wood from the tree that fell on her house about a year ago to bring home to burn. Earlier in the day, I took photos at Leominster State Forest. I went hiking at Leominster State Forest last night and went back today to get some more photos. I will be posting the photos I took in this blog for you to see what I did not post for my 365 project.

When I was at her house, I noticed a lot of asters. I also saw that there was an abundant number of bees flying around the asters. What a great photo opportunity. The aster flowers (Aster spp.) add color to the autumn landscape while offering beauty with little work when caring for asters.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

Photographic Thoughts — 10/03/2021 to 10/09/2021

“I never have taken a picture I’ve intended. They’re always better or worse.” — Diane Arbus

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 10/03/2021: Posted photo — Reflection in the Fog.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/80 s, 113 mm.

Driving into church this morning, I notice fog off the lakes in the area. The location of this photo is one in which I take many practice photos. It is a difficult location to take a photo since I needed to stop on the edge of a busy road.

My initial thought on this photo was to get a picture of the mist rising from the surface of the lake with the foliage behind it. When I arrived at this location, the mist was thicker than I would like. I did see the reflections of the trees on the water and thought that that would take a good photo.

Monday, 10/04/2021: Posted photo — Western Tanager.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 200, f/6.3, 1/320 s, 300 mm.

Fact from All About Birds: “The oldest Western Tanager on record—a male originally banded in Nevada in 1965—had lived at least 6 years and 11 months by the time he was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in Oregon in 1971.”

We were walking the north rim at Grand Canyon National Park when I spotted this male Western Tanager in a conifer tree. The color contrast between the bird and the tree caught my eye.

The range of the Western Tanger is the western parts for the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Again, from All About Birds: “A clear look at a male Western Tanager is like looking at a flame: an orange-red head, brilliant yellow body, and coal-black wings, back and tail. Females and immatures are a somewhat dimmer yellow-green and blackish. These birds live in open woods all over the West, particularly among evergreens, where they often stay hidden in the canopy. Nevertheless, they’re a quintessential woodland denizen in summertime, where they fill the woods with their short, burry song and low, chuckling call notes.” (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Western_Tanager/overview)

Tuesday, 10/05/2021: Posted photo — The Gathering.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 3200, f/7.1, 1/100 s, 135 mm.

On my way home from work today I saw this rafter of turkey. I have seen them many times before on the property and did not feel the need to photograph them. Today was different.

When I was approaching them today, it looked like it was a group of workers getting ready to clock out of work and were planning what they were going to do tonight. Just the way they were gather in pairs and it looked like they were talking to each other.

Also, I thought it would be a good picture to take.

Wednesday, 10/06/2021: Posted photo — Cattails.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5, 1/800 s, 52 mm.

I had a choice of photos to post today — a photo of an island or a photo of cattails. I decided on the cattails for the photo to put in my 365 project because I liked it just a little bit better than the photo of the island. I will be posting both in this blog for you to compare.

Cattails are a type of aquatic plant, approximately 5-10 feet tall. These plants have long, slender, branchless, and upward-growing leaves and a distinguishable brown, cylindrical flowering head at their apex. The grow around ponds and other wetland areas.

What is the difference between a pond and a lake? Here is something I found in my research: “To help determine the difference, both the depth and surface area must be considered. Lakes are normally much deeper than ponds and have a larger surface area. All the water in a pond is in the photic zone, meaning ponds are shallow enough to allow sunlight to reach the bottom. This causes plants (sometimes too many) to grow at the bottom of ponds as well as on their surface. However, sunlight can’t reach the bottom of all areas of lakes. Lakes have aphotic zones, which are deep areas of water that receive no sunlight, preventing plants from growing.” (https://lakes.grace.edu/ponds-vs-lakes-whats-the-difference/)

I took the cattail photo with a shallow depth of field (DOF) to blur the background and the make the cattails “pop”. As you can tell by this photo, the cattails are starting to spread their seeds.

Here is the photo of the island that I took and did not like as much as the cattail photo.

Thursday, 10/07/2021: Posted photo — Sunset Through Trees.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/160 s, 100 mm.

After a week and a half, I was back on the hiking trail today. It felt good to get back. I hiked 4.3 miles on Wachusett Mountain after work with some colleagues. I took a series of photos along the way to determine what one to post. I decided on this sunset photo. I had another sunset photo that I took from the summit, but I accidently deleted it. Rookie mistake.

The other choices of photos were a glacial erratic called Balanced Rock or a burl on a tree at a trail junction. Just a reminder that a glacial erratic is glacially deposited rock differing from the size and type of rock native to the area in which it rests. And a burl is a strange-looking collection of tree cells, which are called callus tissue. Normally, callus tissue is formed by a tree in response to an environmental injury such as a pruning cut, disease, or insect damage. If you have a piece of wooden furniture, such as an end table, it was most likely made with a burl.

These are the photos that I did not post for my 365 project.

Friday, 10/08/2021: Post photo — Pareidolia.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/10, 1/250 s, 21 mm.

Pareidolia is the defined by Merriam-Webster as the tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern. I have posted about this tendency in the past.

Today I am posting a photo of a cloud. I see a couple items in this photo. I see an opera singer hitting a high note and I also see a ships figurehead. It is amazing how one can see an object when one is not there.

What to you see? Do you see what I see, due to the power of suggestion, or do you see something else. Please respond in the comment section.

Saturday, 10/09/2021: Post photo — Iris Bouquet.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 100, f/1.7, 1/60 s, 4 mm

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac: “The tall, beautiful iris, named after the Greek goddess who rode rainbows, comes in many magical colors. Despite its divine origins, this June bloomer is rugged, reliable, and easy to grow. Learn all about planting, growing, and caring for iris flowers.” (https://www.almanac.com/plant/irises)

Today was a shopping day from me. Saw this iris bouquet in one of the stores that I shopped. I like the colors.

Saturday’s posts are normally short because of the time between I take the photo and the time that I post my blog.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

Photographic Thoughts — 09/26/2021 to 10/02/2021

“I wish that all of nature’s magnificence, the emotion of the land, the living energy of place could be photographed.” — Annie Leibovitz

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Quick posts this week.

Sunday, 09/26/2021: Posted photo — What is It.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/13 s, 67 mm.

When I posted this photo, I did not expect someone to identify the object as quickly as they did. This is not a common item. Only people that have seen this object before could possibly identify it. I was surprised when someone knew what it was within an hour of my post. It happened to be on the first guess!

The object is the foot pedals of an organ. This is the organ at my church. I played the organ for many years when I was younger. I have not played on for a great while.

I will have to post a harder photo next time.

Monday, 09/27/2021: Posted photo — Vacancy.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/5, 1/50 s, 55 mm.

The previous occupant of this web has vacated the property.

Occasionally I see a great spider web at this location. I took this photo before the web was destroyed by the wind.

Tuesday, 09/28/2021: Posted photo — Wet Seasoned Wood.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/5.6, 1/6 s, 62 mm.

Quick photo Tuesday.

I needed a photo for today and looked at the wood pile as I was getting out of my car after work.

Wednesday, 09/29/2021: Posted photo — Third Quarter.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/16, 1/125 s, 300 mm.

Handheld photo of the third quarter of the moon. I took this photo about three hours after the official time of the third quarter.

The eight phases of the Moon in order are (according to NASA):

  • New Moon: This is the invisible phase of the Moon, with the illuminated side of the Moon facing the Sun and the night side facing Earth.
  • Waxing Crescent: This silver sliver of a Moon occurs when the illuminated half of the Moon faces mostly away from Earth, with only a tiny portion visible to us from our planet.
  • First Quarter: The Moon is now a quarter of the way through its monthly journey, and you see half of its illuminated side.
  • Waxing Gibbous: Now most of the Moon’s dayside has come into view, and the Moon appears brighter in the sky.
  • Full Moon: This is as close as we come to seeing the Sun’s illumination of the entire day side of the Moon (so, technically, this would be the real half moon).
  • Waning Gibbous: As the Moon begins its journey back toward the Sun, the opposite side of the Moon now reflects the Moon’s light.
  • Last Quarter: The Moon looks like its half illuminated from the perspective of Earth, but really, you’re seeing half of the half of the Moon that’s illuminated by the Sun ― or a quarter.
  • Waning Crescent: The Moon is nearly back to the point in its orbit where its dayside directly faces the Sun, and all that we see from our perspective is a thin curve.

Thursday, 09/30/2021: Posted photo — Color.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/400 s, 50 mm.

The colors of the leaves on the trees are starting to turn. This seems later than normal this year. Could be because of all the rain we have received over the summer.

Friday, 10/01/2021: Post photo — Starlight.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/50 s, 290 mm.

Sol. The nearest star to the earth.

I have been looking for my solar filter for a while. There was a partial solar eclipse a few months ago and could not find it. I was looking for a framed photo to bring to my uncle for his birthday last week and found it amongst my photos.

I took it out today and took a photo of the sun.

Saturday, 10/02/2021: Post photo — Angels.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/13, 1/500 s, 52 mm.

I went to visit my parents today at the cemetery. They are buried next to the clergy section of the cemetery. When I looked over to the clergy section, I saw these angels under a tree. Looking at what is on the sign, it seems that there are other’s in the cemetery.

I liked the foliage next to the monument, so I took this picture.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 09/19/2021 to 09/25/2021

“You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” — Ansel Adams

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 09/19/2021: Posted photo — Trail Marker.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/25 s, 31 mm.

This is an old trail marker on Wachusett Mountain. There are a few trails on the mountain that have the trail name carved into stone. When I see these markings, I wonder how long it took for someone to carve the marking.

I took this photo to show how the trails were marked many years ago.

Monday, 09/20/2021: Posted photo — Harvest Moon.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/13, 1/100 s, 1250 mm.

I take many moon photos. The moon is my primary subject matter and is very difficult to photograph. Many have tried but have not gotten a good photo since the moon is very bright and is moving very fast. I have taken hundreds of moon photos and decided to change my setting slightly for this photo.

For this photo, I changed the focal length of this moon photo to 1250 mm to see if I could get a better focus on this subject.

From space.com: “Traditionally, this designation goes to the full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal (fall) equinox — which is most often in September. On average, October Harvest Moons come at three-year intervals, although the time frame can be quite variable, and there can be situations where as many as eight years can elapse (the next such example will come between 2020 and 2028).

At the peak of the harvest, farmers can work into the night by the light of this moon. Usually, the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice — indigenous staples in North America — are ready for gathering.”

Tuesday, 09/21/2021: Posted photo — Wachusett Mountain.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/250 s, 79 mm.

Today I needed a quick photo, so I took a photo of Wachusett Mountain over Round Meadow Pond.

Wednesday, 09/22/2021: Posted photo — Heart.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/250 s, 135 mm.

People see items in ordinary item in the strangest places. This weekend I saw this rock looking like a hike at the trailhead of the Hancock’s in the White Mountains.

Seeing familiar objects or patterns in otherwise random or unrelated objects or patterns is called pareidolia. It’s a form of apophenia, which is a more general term for the human tendency to seek patterns in random information.

Thursday, 09/23/2021: Posted photo — Mushroom.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 3200, f/7.1, 1/30 s, 87 mm.

Have you noticed that there are many more mushrooms this year then in the past? At least here in north central Massachusetts and in the mountains of New Hampshire. The photo I took today was on one of the trails on Wachusett Mountain. I took this photo on my way to the summit. I was planning on taking a sunset photo tonight but there was cloud cover at the summit. I was happy that I took this photo so I would have something to post today.

Friday, 09/24/2021: Post photo — Abstract Painting.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/8 s, 31 mm.

Abstract art is art that does not attempt to represent an accurate depiction of a visual reality but instead use shapes, colors, forms, and gestural marks to achieve its effect. Abstract art is made up of six basic elements: Line, Texture, Shape, Form, Color, and Value. You can go online to find more about these elements.

Saturday, 09/25/2021: Post photo — FaceTime with Daughter.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/5, 1/100 s, 57 mm.

My uncle turned 92 years old this week. We had a party for him this afternoon.

During the party, his daughter from Maine called him to FaceTime. He was figuring out how to talk to her. It was difficult to hear them on the phone due to all the noise from the party.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 09/12/2021 to 09/18/2021

“To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting an ordinary place… I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.” — Elliott Erwitt

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 09/12/2021: Posted photo — Trail Mix.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/7.1, 1/10 s, 135 mm.

Trail mix is typically a blend of cereals, dried fruits, nuts and often sweets, trail mix can be a mixture of crunchy and chewy, salty, or sweet. My trail mix is a mixture of different types of M&Ms, nuts, and Chex mix.

I snack on trail mix off and on the trail. I like the mixture of the different textures and tastes of the food. Trail mix may not be the most nutritious food to eat, but it does cut down on my hunger and keeps me energized on my hikes.

Monday, 09/13/2021: Posted photo — Sunset from the Summit.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/7.1, 1/3200 s, 135 mm.

Every sunset is different, and none disappoint. Some are more spectacular and colorful than other. The anticipation of how the sunset will look is one of the great things about them.

This is why sunsets are so colorful according to Brian Resnick in an article in Science and Health “Sunset colors are created by a phenomenon called Rayleigh scattering. It is the same phenomenon that makes the sky appear blue during the day.

Sunlight contains all the colors of the rainbow. But not all the colors reach the ground in the same concentration. Nitrogen and oxygen molecules in our atmosphere act as little mirrors for blue and violet light. That means not as much blue or violet light reaches the ground. Instead, it bounces around in our atmosphere, creating the blue dome of sky we’re all so familiar with.

At sunset, light must travel through a greater distance of atmosphere to reach our eyes — so even more blue light, and even some green and yellow light, gets filtered out. That leaves us with the warmer hues of the visible light, the reds and oranges, and it’s why many sunsets look like fire.”

Tuesday, 09/14/2021: Posted photo — Maggiore Fun Flame.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 100, f/1.7, 1/60 s, 4 mm

A Maggiore Fun Flame is a stunning dahlia with huge, fiery red and yellow flowers. Its tall stems are perfect for cutting. It Reblooms effortlessly all season long. The dahlia is an eye-catching, fuss-free summer accent for containers, beds, and borders. The flower needs to be watered regularly — twice-weekly, or more often in extreme heat or containers. It also is good at attracting butterflies.

I saw this flower on my shopping trip this evening. I took a photo of it because I just liked the way it looked. The colors and textures caught my eyes.

Wednesday, 09/15/2021: Posted photo — Tent.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/7.1, 1/160 s, 26 mm.

A tent is an important piece of equipment if you are going on an overnight hiking trip or just camping in general. This is the tent that I use when hiking and/or camping when I am not using my roof top tent. This tent is lightweight and very easy to set up. It is well ventilated when the rain cover is not installed. My son was camping the last two weekends and borrowed my tent. All my hikes in the White Mountains were either day trips or I stayed in my brother’s condo. Setting up a tent is not as easy as one my think. You need to be aware of your surroundings to make sure that you will not get washed out in case of rain, or have blood rush to your head if you are setting up on a slopped surface.

Thursday, 09/16/2021: Posted photo — Mount Hancock.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/6.3, 1/400 s, 47 mm.

This photo was taken a few years ago when I hiked Mount Hancock (4,403′) along with Mount South Hancock (4,278′) for the Flags on the 48 event. The event was sponsored by the Worcester Chapter of the Appalachian Mountain Club. I was the peak coordinator, while senior members of the AMC were leading and sweeping the hike.

Hancock Mountain is a 4,380 foot mountain in the Pemigewasset Wilderness area of the White Mountains between Franconia Notch and Crawford Notch. The mountain is named after John Hancock, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. The mountain used to be the most remote and inaccessible peak in the White Mountains, before theKancamagus Highway was finished. Today, the trail begins on the well known hairpin turn on the Kancamagus Highway at the Hancock Overlook Parking area.

When I hiked it for the Flags on the 48, I hiked with the person who blazed the original trail up to the summit, Hancock Notch Trail. He showed us photos of the trail being blazed and would tell us stories of how they decided to make the trial were it is located. There is a landmark rock in the woods near the summit. We did some exploring to see if it was still there since it had been many years since he blazed the trail.

The weather is looking wet for my hike on Saturday. If I do not make it to the summits, the mountain will still be there. If I do make it to both peaks, I would have a total of ten 4,000 footers this year. 4,000 foot mountains my not seem difficult to some of you. I have heard from people that live and hike in the taller, younger mountains, in the western United Stated that the mountains in the Whites are more challenging. I have hiked a few mountains out west and agree with their assessment. The prominence of some of the mountains in the Whites is more than the prominence of the mountains out west.

Friday, 09/17/2021: Post photo — Foggy Hike.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 100, f/1.7, 1/120 s, 4 mm

Went on a group sunset hike tonight through Leominster State Forest. As you can see, it was foggy and misty, so I did not see the setting sun tonight. The hike was almost three miles long and easy. It was a good warm up for my hike tomorrow, weather permitting.

This tree is one that I have photographed a few times before. I just like the way that it is isolated in the middle of the pond.

Saturday, 09/18/2021: Post photo — Mount Osceola.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/640 s, 41 mm.

Mount Osceola as seen from the Mount Hancock trailhead this morning. Today I hiked Mounts Hancock and South Hancock with a few people associated with the group that I hike with on Monday nights. Rain was in the forecast for the later in the afternoon. The weather held up until the last 1.8 miles of the 9.8 mile hike.

Mount Osceola is one of the 4,000 footers that I have climbed.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 09/05/2021 to 09/11/2021

“Beauty can be seen in all things, seeing and composing the beauty is what separates the snapshot from the photograph.” — Matt Hardy

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 09/05/2021: Posted photo — Angel.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/100 s, 67 mm.

This is a statue in the flower garden near the rectory of the church I attend. I have never noticed this angel before, so the new priest could have put it in. It is a welcome addition to the grounds.

I like the black-eye Susan’s that blanket the statue making the statue stand out.

Monday, 09/06/2021: Posted photo — Playthings.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/60 s, 24 mm.

Today is a holiday, Labor Day. Labor Day is an annual celebration of workers and their achievements, originated during one of American labor history’s most dismal chapters. “In the wake of this massive unrest and to repair ties with American workers, Congress passed an act making Labor Day a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories. On June 28, 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed it into law.” according to the History Channel.

Even though today is a holiday, I still planned on going on my Monday night hike. My in-laws called me and wanted to know if I wanted to go to the cottage to visit and to have some food. I only had a couple of hours between the call and the hike, so I went over. I noticed a new picnic table for my grandniece and liked the color contrast with the wet ground. The slide in this photo was in the water for many years, until she wanted to play on it. We took it out of the water and cleaned it the best that we could for her to play on.

Tuesday, 09/07/2021: Posted photo — Cannon.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/125 s, 25mm.

This cannon at the Westminster town common. The plaque states: “Dedicated to the memory of all the men and women from Westminster who have served their country in time of war and peace.” This cannon is not on display year-round.

I ran a few errands today and drove by town common on the way back looking for something to photograph. I saw the cannon and took this photo. The town common is being cleaned up with old trees being removed and new trees being planted.

Wednesday, 09/08/2021: Posted photo — Handheld Falls.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/20, 1/4 s, 36 mm.

It was getting late today, and I was trying to decide what to photograph today. As I have stated many times in my blogs, I take photos of items during the day and decide later what photo to post. When I drove by one of my favorite locations to photograph, I wanted to test out how steady my hand can be. I practice long exposure photography a few times a month. During some of my hikes, I see flowing water and need to practice holding still while taking photos.

I did take many other photos today and liked this one the best. This is one of my favorite spots to photograph and it is one of the favorite locations for people looking at my photos.

Thursday, 09/09/2021: Posted photo — That Time of Year.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/15 s, 135 mm.

Some trees are changing, some trees are not changing. Our sugar maple is one of the first trees on our property to change colors in the fall. Because of changes in the length of daylight and changes in temperature, leaves stop their food-making process. The chlorophyll breaks down, the green color disappears, and the yellow to orange colors become visible.

Friday, 09/10/2021: Post photo — Red-Tailed Hawk.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/800 s, 135 mm.

This morning this red-tailed hawk was spotted on campus at work. First, we thought it was a rabbit and then an owl. I took my camera out to get a closer look at it and to photograph it. I was surprised to see that it was a red-tailed hawk. The hawk did not move from its position and allowed me to walk very close to it. I kept my eyes open and was very alert that the mother of this hawk could have been around, and I did not want to be attacked by her. It did not look like it was injured but it stayed in the same location for over an hour. Someone saw it walk across the lawn so I could have been injured.

I took many photos if it and like these the best. I did not know what one to post so I made a collage out of them to post as one photo. I liked the look of the closed eyes showing its eyelids and I like the profile of the hawk.

Saturday, 09/11/2021: Post photo — Flags on the 48.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/7.1, 1/500 s, 18 mm.

Not much room on Mount Willey for a group photo. Here is the group squeezed into the overlook for a photo. This hike was for the annual Flags on the 48 event.

“We in the hiking community continue to honor the deceased with a tribute: flying the American flag atop all 48 four-thousand foot and higher mountains in New Hampshire on the Saturday closest to September 11. By demonstrating our steadfast unity in this challenging endeavor, we also hope to express our unwavering support to the families, friends, and communities whose losses are beyond comprehension and whose suffering we remember in our hearts.” — Flags on the 48 website.

I have been doing the Flags for the last 10 years mostly with the same core of people. There are two of us that have been doing if for all 10 years with various other people joining us. Out of all the people in this photo, nine of them have been hiking with us for several years. This group has not done the same peak twice.

A member of our group does a great tribute to all that passed away from that day 20 years ago to the day of the hike. The names are placed at the base of our flag.

Thank you again for having faith and my abilities. Now I need to go through the photo and pick some out.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 08/29/2021 to 09/04/2021

“A good photograph is one that communicates a fact, touches the heart and leaves the viewer a changed person for having seen it. It is, in a word, effective.” — Irving Penn

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 08/29/2021: Posted photo — Hobblebush.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 125, f/1.7, 1/60 s, 4 mm

“The fruit of the Hobblebush reportedly may be eaten raw or cooked and is said to taste somewhat like raisins or dates. Hobblebush has a number of medicinal uses. The Algonquin Indians reportedly rubbed its mashed leaves on the head to treat migraines. Iroquois Indians are said to-have used a decoction of roots as a blood medicine. The plant was also used to treat chest and breathing problems.” — Adirondacks Forever Wild website.

Hobblebush on Wachusett Mountain

These Hobblebush berries are growing on Wachusett Mountain. I took this photo during a hike I took today. I have seen them during my weekly hikes and thought that they would look good in a photo. I was glad to see that one of the berries had turned blue.

Monday, 08/30/2021: Posted photo — Mushrooms.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/80 s, 62 mm.

According to the University of New Hampshire Agricultural department and Better Homes and Garden: “Mushrooms grow from spores (not seeds) that are so tiny you can’t see individual spores with the naked eye. Rather than soil, these spores rely on substances like sawdust, grain, straw, or wood chips for nourishment. A blend of the spores and these nutrient sources is called spawn. Mushrooms like dark, cool, and humid growing environments. Prolonged periods of wet, humid weather, such as we have had over the past few weeks, cause fungi to send up fruiting structures. Fungi disperse to new areas via windblown spores. When the spores land in a suitable location they develop into new fungi which will grow mushrooms given enough time.

Mushrooms in our yard

Mushrooms will go away on their own once the weather dries out. Keep in mind that although these fruiting bodies have disappeared, the fungal mycelia is still growing in the soil. The fungus will continue to grow and persist as long as there is plenty of organic matter to feed upon.”

These mushrooms were growing in my front yard. They are in the same spot each time they grow. We have had many days of rain, so it is a great growing condition for mushrooms.

Tuesday, 08/31/2021: Posted photo — Rose for an Angel.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/125 s, 79mm.

Our daughter had a rare disorder, Triploidy. I did have the medical definition of this disorder in this post. I removed that part of my post since it would be too sensitive to some people.

Pink rose

Almost every year I go and visit her to sing her Happy Birthday and to say a prayer with her. It is not easy losing a child. We have had this rose since she was born and it means a lot to me.

Wednesday, 09/01/2021: Posted photo — Bouquet.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 125, f/1.7, 1/60 s, 4 mm

To continue my two-day flower series, I took a photo of this bouquet. I liked the colors in the bouquet.

Flower bouquet

Once again this photo was taking during the day just in case, I did not take another photo that day.

Thursday, 09/02/2021: Posted photo — Mount Monadnock.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/15 s, 135 mm.

Mount Monadnock at sunset

I summited Wachusett Mountain twice today. The first time was with colleagues from work, the second time was with a hiking group. During the first hike of the day, I took the photo of the flowing water. During the second hike of the day, I arrived at the summit just after sunset. I looked to the north and saw the great colors of the sunset around Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire.

Flowing stream along the Bicentennial Trail on Wachusett Mountain

Friday, 09/03/2021: Post photo — Petroglyphs.

Settings: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS, ISO 200, f/8, 1/400 s, 190 mm.

These Petroglyphs are in Capital Reef National Park.

Petroglyph in Capital Reef National Park

A pictograph is an image or designs made by painting on rocks or in cave. A petroglyph is an image created by removing part of a rock surface by incising, picking, carving, or abrading, as a form of rock art. Petroglyphs tell stories of events that have happened. They are like the newspapers of today. There is one petroglyph outside the Needles section of Canyonlands National Park that the experts still have not deciphered.

Saturday, 09/04/2021: Post photo — Mount Whiteface.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/320 s, 50 mm.

I decided to take a warmup hike today before the Flags on the 48 event next weekend.

I chose a mountain that I need for my repeat 48 4,000 footers and that was close to home. I decided on Mount Whiteface since I have not done it as one of my repeat 48 and it was only two and a half hours from home. People normally hike Mount Passaconway with Mount Whiteface but today I did not do both since this was a warmup hike and I have some things that I needed to do at home tonight.

Mount Whiteface

Mount Whiteface is a 4,019 ft mountain located in Grafton County, New Hampshire. The mountain is part of the Sandwich Range of the White Mountains. Whiteface is flanked to the northwest by Mount Tripyramid, and to the northeast by Mount Passaconaway. Mount Passaconaway is a 4,043 ft mountain about three miles from Mount Whiteface.

Mount Passaconaway

Thank you again for having faith and my abilities. Now I need to go through the photo and pick some out.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 08/22/2021 to 08/28/2021

“What I like about photographs is that they capture a moment that’s gone forever, impossible to reproduce.” — Karl Lagerfeld

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Sunday, 08/22/2021: Posted photo — Stained Glass.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/80 s, 32 mm.

This stained glass shows the initial for Ava Maria. Ava Maria is a prayer to the Virgin Mary used in Catholic worship. The first line is adapted from Luke 1:28. Ave Maria is also called Hail Mary.

Ave Maria in stained glass

“Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.”

Why did I take this photo — I took this photo because last week I took a photo of some stained glass windows with my cell phone and I wanted to take a better photo. I took my DSLR with me into church this morning, saw the glimmer of light amongst the rain, and took this photo.

Monday, 08/23/2021: Posted photo — Wet Leaf.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/40 s, 135 mm.

Tropical Storm Henri just paid a visit to the area. Yesterday there were some gusts of wind and a little rain in this area. Some other areas around me received more wind damage and rain.

Today I was walking around and say the water beading off this leaf, so I took a photo of it. Always keep your eyes open to the wonders of nature.

Water drops on a leaf

Later in the day, I took my normal Monday night hike up Wachusett Mountain. There was only two of us this week because of the heavy rain that came in this afternoon. It was wet and rainy on the way to the summit, and it was very wet and heavy rain on the way down. When I hike, I just keep wiping the water from my eyes and just follow the tail. You need to take all your steps very carefully. Hiking is still fun in the rain.

Tuesday, 08/24/2021: Posted photo — Web.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/5.6, 1/20 s, 135 mm.

Is it just me, or are there many more spiders this year that there have been in the past? I keep seeing webs and the light shining off the webs. Today I stopped and attempted to take a photo of a web in the sunlight.

Spider web

Looking at the photo, it looks like my ISO was set too high since the web looks blown out to me.

Wednesday, 08/25/2021: Posted photo — Moon.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/16, 1/125 s, 300 mm.

Look, Joe took another moon photo!

Just another moon shot

This morning, as the moon does many times, I was just called to take a photo of the moon.

Thursday, 08/26/2021: Posted photo — Hike.

Settings: N/A.

This is not a photo. I took many photos today and did not like any of them good enough to post.

Thursday night hike

This is a photo of the trail I took tonight on Wachusett Mountain in the heat. The hike was 3.5 miles long, it started in the light, and ended in the dark. The air was very moist and heavy. When you hike in situation similar to this, you must drink plenty of water.

Friday, 08/27/2021: Post photo — Aialik Glacier.

Settings: N/A.

Aialik Glacier is the largest glacier in Aialik Bay, located in Kenai Fjords National Park. While stable, the glacier calves most actively in May and June. We say the glacier in June and saw the calves.

We went to Alaska in 2016 for our 25th wedding anniversary with my son and niece. Alaska is a great place to visit. If you have an opportunity to visit, please do so.

Poster created from my photo of the Aialik Glacier

About the photo. I took some of my travel photos and made posters of them to remember were the photo was taken. It was a fun process to learn a new photo editing technique. I made a photo script to help me do this for my photos. The script will resize the photos and add the text and boarder.

Saturday, 08/28/2021: Post photo — Mr. and Ms.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/125 s, 24 mm.

I would like to thank Doug and Vicky for allowing me to photograph there special day. This was my first official wedding that I photographed. They had faith in me do this knowing that I am primarily a landscape photographer.

Mr. and Ms. Chase-Dame

I have worked with Doug’s father for many years. He asked me if I was comfortable enough to take photos as his son’s wedding, I said I would love to do so. As you can see from the photo, they are a fun couple. When I was told that there were wearing Hawaiian shirts for the wedding, I thought that just Doug was going to wear one. When I went to their house and saw that everyone in the family had one on, I went home to put my shirt from Hawaii on to fit in with the crowd. My house was on the way from the morning photoshoot to the wedding.

Thank you again for having faith and my abilities. Now I need to go through the photo and pick some out.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 08/15/2021 to 08/21/2021

“One doesn’t stop seeing. One doesn’t stop framing. It doesn’t turn off and turn on. It’s on all the time.” — Annie Leibovitz

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

This week will only be photos.

My computer hard drive crashed this week. I was able to recover information late Saturday so no commentary this week.

Sunday, 08/15/2021: Posted photo — Church.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 125, f/1.7, 1/60 s, 4 mm

Monday, 08/16/2021: Posted photo — Brace.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/120 s84, 4 mm

Tuesday, 08/17/2021: Posted photo — Change in Season.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/250 s, 52 mm.

Wednesday, 08/18/2021: Posted photo — Cloud.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 800, f/7.1, 1/6 s, 48 mm.

Thursday, 08/19/2021: Posted photo — Rock.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 100, f/1.7, 1/60 s, 4 mm

Friday, 08/20/2021: Post photo — Red Sox Win.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/100 s, 74 mm.

Saturday, 08/21/2021: Post photo — Clouds.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/8144 s, 4 mm

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe. Back to normal next week.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!

Photographic Thoughts — 08/08/2021 to 08/14/2021

“The whole point of taking pictures is so that you don’t have to explain things with words.” — Elliott Erwitt

Thank you for all the new views and likes from last week, it helps keep me inspired.

Enjoy this week’s rambling mind of a mechanical engineer and photographer.

Sunday, 08/08/2021: Posted photo — Balancing the World.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 400, f/7.1, 1/160 s, 106 mm.

My wife’s family have a reunion the first Saturday of August every year. Relatives from all around the country, and sometimes the world, come to visit. The reunion is only schedule for one day yet it occurs over the course of the week.

My brother-in-law likes to juggle. He juggles clubs, balls, boxes, fire clubs, fire balls, scarfs, and people. He also does tricks for the younger members of the family. People young and old look forward to his juggling act. In this picture, he is spinning the parasols to balance the world.

Monday, 08/09/2021: Posted photo — Backpack.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 80, f/1.7, 1/120 s, 4 mm

Monday night is hiking night, as some of you may know by now. We purchased a new backpack for my son since his is old and losing padding. I tried out his backpack tonight to see how comfortable it is to use. This photo was taken on the summit fire watch tower on Wachusett Mountain.

For your information, the backpack was comfortable for short hikes. I may not be so for the longer hikes we have planned so we will be purchasing another backpack for him.

Tuesday, 08/10/2021: Posted photo — Can You Hear Me.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/5.6, 1/1600 s, 135 mm.

Hearing protection is required when one is exposed to a sound level over 85 dB for 8 hrs. Some examples of how loud that is are: Garbage disposal, dishwasher, average factory, freight train (at 15 meters). Car wash at 20 ft (89 dB); propeller plane flyover at 1000 ft (88 dB); diesel truck 40 mph at 50 ft (84 dB); diesel train at 45 mph at 100 ft (83 dB). Food blender (88 dB); milling machine (85 dB); garbage disposal (80 dB). Manufacturing plants have sound levels that exceed the 85 dB threshold so hearing protection is required.

binary comment

Why did I take this photo? I took it since I liked the mixture of colors in the container. This is one of the photos that I took today for my photo project. I liked this one over the other once that I took today. I will not be posting the other photos I took. That should be telling you the quality of those photos.

Wednesday, 08/11/2021: Posted photo — Feed Me.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/125 s, 135 mm.

These birds were waiting for their mother to feed them. I have walked past then a few times over the last two weeks and decided to take their photo today. I took a similar photo last year. I like the way that one of the birds is looking for food and the other one is just looking like he is annoyed.

Thursday, 08/12/2021: Posted photo — Find the Meteor.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 1600, f/4, 15 s, 28 mm.

The Perseids are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift–Tuttle. The meteors are called the Perseids because the point from which they appear to hail lies in the constellation Perseus. The meteor shower reached it peak this year at 4:01 a.m. today. The photo is dark because I had to adjust for the light pollution in the area. I look online and see these great photos of the meteor shower taken from dark sky areas. Someday I will travel to a dark sky area during a meteor shower. Last year I posted my first photo of the Milky Way from a dark sky reserve, Canyonland National Park. Dark Sky Reserves are designated by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). They are areas that offer exceptional starry nights and are specifically protected for scientific, natural, educational, cultural, heritage and/or public enjoyment.

Did you find it? Look northwest of the “Seven Sisters”. What are the “Seven Sisters”?

From space.com: “The Pleiades are a group of more than 800 stars located about 410 light-years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. Most skywatchers are familiar with the assembly, which looks something like a smaller, hazier version of the Big Dipper in the night sky.

Also known as the “Seven Sisters” and Messier 45, the object derives its English name from Greek legend. The Pleiades are the seven daughters of the Titan god Atlas and the ocean nymph Pleione. During an ancient war, Atlas rebelled against Zeus, the king of the gods, who sentenced his foe to forever hold up the heavens on his shoulders. The sisters were so sad that Zeus allowed them a place in the sky in order to be close to their father.”

Friday, 08/13/2021: Post photo — Sunflower.

Settings: Samsung SM-G930V (Galaxy S7), ISO 50, f/1.7, 1/287 s, 4 mm

Sunflowers have symbolic meanings in love, luck, spirituality, and dreams. Why did I post a photo a sunflower today? Today is Friday the 13.

From my web research I found out more information. This is from the CNN website: “From Scandinavia, Panati explains, the superstition then spread south throughout Europe, becoming well established along the Mediterranean by the start of the Christian era. It was here that the unsettling power of the numerals was cemented through the story of the Last Supper, which was attended by Jesus Christ and his disciples on Maundy Thursday. The 13th and most infamous guest to arrive, Judas Iscariot, was the disciple who betrayed Jesus, leading to his crucifixion on Good Friday.”

For you that follow FOX news: “According to the history website, the association of 13 being unlucky likely started in Western culture the Last Supper in the Bible. In the biblical story, 13 people sat at the Last Supper table – Jesus and his 12 disciples – and the next day, Jesus was crucified.”

Here is wishing you luck today.

Saturday, 08/14/2021: Post photo — Sunrise.

Settings: Canon EOS 60D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/160 s, 300 mm.

Saturday is my day to sleep in. I wake up around 4:30 a.m. every day so I look forward to sleeping in on Saturday mornings. Today I woke up at 4 a.m. to climb Wachusett Mountain to take a photo of the sunrise.

When I arrived at the summit, I was the only one there. The sky was clear until just about the time the sun was to rise, 5:42 a.m. There was a fog bank that rolled in. I could see the sun over the horizon since I knew the location that it was to rise. I was giving up hope of seeing the sunrise. Then the fog burned off just enough for me to take this photo.

I went back to bed for a few hours when I came back home from my hike.

That is all for now. Until next week, be safe.

For more photo of other project I have work, visit my website: https://photobyjosephciras.weebly.com/ or visit me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PhotobyJosephCiras/.

COVID is real! Be safe out there, keep your social distance, and remember to always wear your mask and wash your hands. Get your vaccine!